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15 years of publication, 17,000+ subscribers                  Monday, December 17, 2012
News and updates to Kathie Nunley's Layered Curriculum Sites for Educatiors:  

A Tip for Helping to Calm Excited Children 
HOT TOPIC: Additional Information on School Bullying and Violence
Letter from a Parent regarding the use of Layered Curriculum in 5th Grade
Misc Chatter & Layered Curriculum Workshop News
 
 

 
A Tip for Helping to Calm Excited Children 
"When the class seems to be getting a bit too lively", writes Debbie Behieris, a teacher at Bellavista Primary in Johannesburg, "I have all the children rub their palms together and then cup their hands over their ears for the count of 10.  It really calms them down!"  
 
Have a teaching tip for us?  Please send it to kathie@brains.org
 


HOT TOPIC: Additional Information on School Bullying and Violence
 
    I received a lot of emailed comments on the HOT TOPIC of bullying in the last issue of this blog. While the Hot Topic was actually on Dr Ferguson's new research on the relationship between youth aggression and the competitive nature of video games, many of you were asking for more information on his other research topic  -school bullying.  
    In light of last week's tragedy, I thought I'd pass along another suggested reading for you.  In 2010, APA published a short but interesting interview with Dr Susan Swearer, a leading researcher on bullying and school aggression titled, "Bullying:  What Parents, Teachers Can do to Stop It".  Let me also suggest Dr Swearer's book Bullying Prevention and Intervention: Realistic Strategies for Schools for additional and more detailed information.  
 
More Hot Topics for this month.........
 

New Book:  HOMEWORK For New Parents
Over the years, I've had a lot of requests to put together a book for new parents on things they can do to help get their children off to a good start during the years before they begin school.  Homework assignments, if you will.  We all know that those preschool years are critical and that brain development and IQ change opportunities are greatest in infancy and early childhood.  So, I've put together ideas and suggestions for parents and am dividing them into the three critical time periods - birth to two, two to five, and 11 - 23.  
 
I've finished the first one, birth to 2 and it will be published in hard copy and Kindle version in early 2013.  However, if you'd like an early copy of it, I'm making it available to newsletter subscribers in a downloadable .pdf ebook format.  You will get the entire booklet, sans the references, which will soon be available at the website and in the final hard copies.  So, if you'd like a copy of "HOMEWORK for New Parents:  Assignments for Raising the IQ of Your Child, birth - 2" you can purchase it for $5.00 only from this link for newsletter subscribers during the month of December.    
 
 

  Letter from a Parent regarding the use of Layered Curriculum in 5th Grade
A parent wrote this month:
Kathie, I'm a parent of a fifth grader. The school my daughter is attending implements Layered Curriculum for Social Studies class. We are a school district with about 15 to 20 (average) kids in a classroom.  One of  your articles mentioned Layered Curriculum can be implemented to any class and any topic, [but] most of your web articles references are for high school classes. How successful is this curriculum  for elementary classes? So far, for us it just has been a lot of homework and parent involvement. They are required to do topics in all 3 layers. Your input will be greatly appreciated. - Karla.  
 
 
Dear Karla,
     Thanks for writing.  While Layered Curriculum® was originally started in a high school classroom, the model has been modified to fit a whole range of grade levels.  In fact, it is probably most popular in the middle grades. 
     I'm not sure what your concerns are, but it sounds like you may be uncomfortable with the way the model is being run in your daughter's classroom.  Of course, with any type of teaching methodology, every teacher puts his or her own style into it. 
     Personally, I prefer to see Layered Curriculum run where all work can be completed in the classroom.  I concur with the large body of research that shows that homework should be used very sparingly, if at all, until high school.  It tends to be detrimental to the learning process in the elementary grades.  I would certainly be concerned if a lot of "parent work" were involved!  I doubt that is the intent of the teacher.  Sounds like perhaps you should have a conference with the teacher and see if there is a way to make the year a better fit for your daughter.

Kathie
 


Misc Chatter & Workshop News
New workshops are in the making right now for Toronto, New York City and Holton, Michigan. The full-day Layered Curriculum workshop in Holton, MI will be on M L King day, January 21st and is open to outside participants.  Details and contact information are posted on the calendar.  We are also planning a full day session (via a long afternoon) in NYC on March 20th.  Contact information for that should be posted this week.    
 
I am currently scheduling presentations for all of 2013.  If you would like more information on hosting a workshop at your school, email me for a brochure.  
And I am attempting to put another trip together for southern Africa in September of 2013. If you are in that region and interested in joining with us, let me know.
 
I know all of us, especially those of us in education, are still reeling from and trying to make some sense out of the tragic massacre in Newtown last week. Please take time today to remember what is truly important in life.  Happy Holidays. 
 
As always, my best to you and yours,
Kathie

Dr Kathie F Nunley
Layered Curriculum(R) . . . because every child deserves a special education (tm)
 

 
 

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15 years of publication, 17,000+ subscribers                  Friday, December 7, 2012
News and updates to Kathie Nunley's Layered Curriculum Sites for Educatiors:  

Tip for Using Your Ipad to give feed back
HOT TOPIC: Beware the Competitive Nature of Video Games
New Units Posted at the Website
Workshop & Conference News
 
 

 
Tip for Using Your Ipad to give feed back
One of the participants in our Tulare County (CA) workshop last month gave us a suggestion on using the IPad app "Notability".  He suggests having your students submit their written work and then you use the app to record your feedback with your voice.  The kids are much more apt to listen to the feed back and apply it, than just read your written notes on their work.  
 
Have a teaching tip for us?  Please send it to kathie@brains.org
 


HOT TOPIC: Beware the Competitive Nature of Video Games
Since last summer, I've been covering a lot of the new research on the relationship between video game violence and aggression.  As we now see, it may in fact be the competition  in video gaming that leads to aggressive behavior and not the violence.   I attended a symposium on the topic last August at the APA conference in Orlando.  Hosted by Dr Christopher J Ferguson, from Texas A&M and well known researcher on violence and bullying (co-author of  The Everything Parent's Guide to Dealing with Bullies).  Participating were leading violence and bullying experts from around the US.  Their current research involved teasing out the 4 suspect variables to video games - violence, competition, pace of action and frustration due to difficulty.  They used a variety of video games that varied in the different components.  What they found was that highly competitive games produced more short-term aggressive behavior, regardless of the violence level.  So it appears that it is the competition in video games that causes behavior concerns and not the violence.  The pace of action and level of difficulty can contribute as well.  The researchers concluded that video game ratings should consider including the level of competition.   Citation here
 
More Hot Topics for this month.........
 

New Book:  HOMEWORK For New Parents
Over the years, I've had a lot of requests to put together a book for new parents on things they can do to help get their children off to a good start during the years before they begin school.  Homework assignments, if you will.  We all know that those preschool years are critical and that brain development and IQ change opportunities are greatest in infancy and early childhood.  So, I've put together ideas and suggestions for parents and am dividing them into the three critical time periods - birth to two, two to five, and 11 - 23.  
 
I've finished the first one, birth to 2 and it will be published in hard copy and Kindle version in early 2013.  However, if you'd like an early copy of it, I'm making it available to newsletter subscribers in a downloadable .pdf ebook format.  You will get the entire booklet, sans the references, which will soon be available at the website and in the final hard copies.  So, if you'd like a copy of "HOMEWORK for New Parents:  Assignments for Raising the IQ of Your Child, birth - 2" you can purchase it for $5.00 only from this link for newsletter subscribers during the month of December.    
 
 

  New Units Posted at the Website
We have a lot of new Layered Curriculum units being posted on the webstie this month.  This is thanks in part to Dr Adrian Sorrell at Texas A&M San Antonio who teaches Layered Curriculum unit construction in his course "Educational Procedures for Exceptional Students." I've received units from Alma Strelnik, Melissa Warren, Marina Martinez, and Misty Jurss.  Also, Tiffany Zaremba in Michigan and Jayne Perkins in Maine sent new units.  Our webmaster is getting all of them posted this week on our samples page.
 


Workshop & Conference News
New workshops are in the making right now for New York City and western Michigan.  It looks like we'll have a Layered Curriculum workshop open to outside participants near Grand Rapids, MI on Martin Luther King Day.  Details to be posted very soon on the calendar.
 
I also have had a couple of inquiries from Johannesburg, South Africa and Namibia about a return trip in 2013.  I would LOVE to get back down there to revisit old friends and make new ones.  We need at least 5 schools or venues to make it feasible for everyone.  So if you are in the southern Africa region and are interested in putting together a day presentation at your location (probably in September 2013), let me know, so we can get this planned.  
 
For those of you in North America, I am currently scheduling presentations for all of 2013.  Included new this year is a follow-up workshop titled "Enhancing Your Layered Curriculum Classroom".  This full day workshop expands Layered Curriculum in technology-savy environments, Blended Learning schools and continues with new information and research on memory systems and developing critical thinking skills.  
 
If you would like more information on hosting a workshop at your school, email me for a brochure.  
 
As always, my best to you and yours,
Kathie

Dr Kathie F Nunley
Layered Curriculum(R) . . . because every child deserves a special education (tm)
 

No time or budget for a full day workshop on Layered Curriculum?  You can order Study Kits - both for individual teachers, or groups.  The individual kits come with a media presenation, books and workbook for putting together your units of study.  Videos available as well.  We now offer book study kits for both "Layered Curriculum" and for "Differentiating the High School Classroom".   
 
 
 
 
 
 

You are receiving this newsletter because you requested to be on my mailing list by entering your email address at one of the two websites. I NEVER share or sell my newsletter list, nor is it used for any other purpose other than this bi-monthly newsletter. Should you need to be removed from the list, simply reply to this and let me know. 


Layered Curriculum(R) is a trademark developed by and registered to Dr. Kathie F Nunley.  Usage information available at: http://help4teachers.com/usage.htm
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15 years of publication, 17,000+ subscribers                   Tuesday, November 27, 2012
News and updates to Kathie Nunley's Layered Curriculum Sites for Educatiors:  

Tips for the K / 1 Classroom
HOT TOPIC: Moderate testing stress improves memory for males
Email Question:  How to ensure students won't stop at the C layer
November News
 

 
Tips for the K / 1 Classroom
 
Deb S in Texas sent a couple of ideas she uses in her grade 1 classroom:  She has a few plastic jump ropes in different colors which she uses to help line children up and move them around the building.  Since her classroom seating is color coded, she can call the "blue group" to line up.  They hold the blue jump  rope.  Then the "yellow group", etc.  The kids hold the jump rope all the way down the hall to the next activity.  She also suggests doing away with the clutter created in school desks, by turning the desks around into pairs or quads and having the storage sections together.  This makes the storage area inaccessible to students. Students learn to put papers in their proper cubbie or file or back pack - not crammed into their desks.  
 
Have a teaching tip for us?  Please send it to kathie@brains.org
 


HOT TOPIC: Moderate Testing Stress improves memory for males
 
In previous newsletters I've covered a lot of research on how retrieval practice is one of the best study tools.  (practice test, practice test, practice test!)   Obviously the more you retrieve something from memory, the easier it is to retrieve.  But new research out in this month's Behavioral Neuroscience Journal, takes the idea of test retrieval one step further.  They had a group of students learn a large body of scientific information.  The next day they subjected half the students to physical stress (cold water immersion stressor) - the other half were the control.  Then immediately tested them all on the information learned the previous day.  They measured stress levels by taking salivary cortisol readings (cortisol is the chemical released during stress).  They retested everyone again on day 3.  
 
Here's what they found:  Cortisol levels were obviously higher in the stress group vs the control group after the cold water stressor.  However, cortisol levels were much higher in the male students than female students.  And the test scores for the men under stress were higher than for the control group, both on day 2 (right after the stress) but also on day 3 (delayed recall).  The test scores of the female students under stress did not differ from the control group either on day 2 or day 3.  So, apparently for males, a bit of stress increases memory retrieval and has long term positive effects on memory as well.  Citation here
 

More Hot Topics for this month.........
 

Email Question:  How to ensure students won't stop at the C layer
I received several emails this week dealing with logistical issues of running a Layered Curriculum classroom.  One was concerning how to prevent students from stopping at the C layer.  A teacher was considering using the term  NM (for "does not meet the content standard") for the C layer as a means of prevention.   
 
My response here was that I would be concerned that "NM" will be perceived as a failing grade - and very discouraging to a student who worked hard to master the key concepts of the C layer.  Instead I suggest that you always start off a Layered Curriculum program with a daily method unit.  A daily method limits each day to one or two specific learning objectives, which everyone works on at the same time.  Days are allocated to all the C layer objectives, then days are allocated to B layer and then to A layer.  This way everyone in the room walks through all 3 layers.  Some teachers use daily method for most of the year.  Some teachers find that doing a couple of units this way is all that is needed for students to understand that all 3 layers are required. You can find more information in "Enhancing Your Layered Curriculum Classroom:  Tips, Tune-ups and Technology".    
 
Ideally your C layer should provide students with enough information that their natural curiosity will propel them into the B layer and class discussions should peak their interest enough to move into the A layer - the real world "stuff".  Layered Curriculum is founded on the idea that children are naturally curious and the brain wants to learn.  If we just point them in the right direction, then get out of their way, students will drive their own learning.  
 
Need more information on motivation theory?  One of my favorite researchers on this topic (you can tell by reading the references on most of my articles and books) is Edward Deci.  A great place to start is with his Why We Do What We Do: Understanding Self-Motivation.  Another great author / researcher on this topic is Daniel Pink.  His latest book, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us is another great source of information for running good student-centered classrooms.     
 
 


November News
 
Here in the US we just wrapped up our Thanksgiving weekend - a holiday dedicated to family, friends and feasting!  My holiday was lovely and most of my family (sans our daughter) made it home.  Even my parents flew up from Texas and our good friends from town joined us too - so we had a wonderful crowd and a bounty of food at the table.  Here's hoping all of you who celebrated were as fortunate as I was.
 
November wraps up my Layered Curriculum workshops for 2012.  I look forward now to some down time - a couple of new books are in the works for my winter break.  I'll be back out on the road though in early January.  
 
I have a new workshop offering for 2013:  "Enhancing Your Layered Curriculum Classroom".  This is a follow-up full day workshop for those of you who have already had the introduction to Layered Curriculum and are ready to go to the next level.  The day offers tips for using Layered Curriculum in technology-savy environments, suggestions for implementing in Blended Learning schools and additional information and resaerch on memory systems and developing critical thinking skills.  
 
I am currently scheduling presentations for all of 2013.  There are a couple of dates left in the spring and many openings for summer / fall 2013.  If you would like more information on hosting a workshop at your school, email me for a brochure.  
 
As always, my best to you and yours,
Kathie

Dr Kathie F Nunley
Layered Curriculum(R) . . . because every child deserves a special education (tm)
 

No time or budget for a full day workshop on Layered Curriculum?  You can order Study Kits - both for individual teachers, or groups.  The individual kits come with a media presenation, books and workbook for putting together your units of study.  Videos available as well.  We now offer book study kits for both "Layered Curriculum" and for "Differentiating the High School Classroom".   
 
 
 
 
 
 

You are receiving this newsletter because you requested to be on my mailing list by entering your email address at one of the two websites. I NEVER share or sell my newsletter list, nor is it used for any other purpose other than this bi-monthly newsletter. Should you need to be removed from the list, simply reply to this and let me know. 


Layered Curriculum(R) is a trademark developed by and registered to Dr. Kathie F Nunley.  Usage information available at: http://help4teachers.com/usage.htm
Having trouble reading this email? View it in your browser.
Unsubscribe and address change information at the bottom
 
15 years of publication, 17,000+ subscribers                   Monday, November 12, 2012
News and updates to Kathie Nunley's Layered Curriculum Sites for Educatiors:  

Fun "first day" activity idea from a middle school teacher
Hot Topic:  Research on School Bullying
More Info on Guided Oral Reading & Pacing with Layered Curriculum
NovemberTravels
 

 
Opening Day "get to know each other" activitiy
 
Here's a teaching tip I received a while back from Daniel Bryant in Berea, Kentucky.  He writes, "Since a number of grade schools feed into our middle school, most of my 6th grade students only know a few of their classmates at the beginning of the school year.  Therefore we start the first class with "Hello Bingo."  This requires the students to mark off their Bingo sheet by finding out things about their classmates. (see example).  Every child that completes the sheet earns a surprise treat."  
 
Instructions:  Write the names of another student that has the qualities or talents or interest for each block in the blank provided.  You may only use a name one time. 
 


HOT TOPIC: Research on School Bullying
 
This past August I had the chance to listen to Dr Dan Olweus, bullying expert and author of Bullying at School: What We Know and What We Can Do.  Dr Olweus was an invited speaker at the APA national convention.  His talk was titled, "School Bullying: Development and Current Status"*.  One of his concerns has been the fact that cyberbullying has been over blown.  There is very little scientific support for its prevalence and growth.  But because it has been over-rated in the media, it is pulling funds and attention from true bullying in our schools.  He states there has been no increase in cyberbullying over the past 10 year and it is a very low frequent form of bullying, and interestingly is equally represented between the genders.  
 
His research has found that bullying correlates with participation in so called "power sports."  In particular, boxing, kickboxing, wrestling and weight lifting increase likelihood of aggression and bullying.  Bullies tend to have a strong need for power and dominance. Over time, the aggressive behavior can actually become rewarded in some situations.  
 
I know see that Dr Olweus has released a bullying prevention program for schools titled, Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Teacher Guide with Dvd/cd-rom.
 
Olweus, D. (2012, Aug 3). School Bullying: Development and Current Status". American Psychological Association Annual Conference, Orlando, FL. 
 

More Hot Topics for this month.........
 


Guided Oral Reading - "Where can I get more information?"
 
A teacher in Ontario emailed me this month looking for more information on Guided Oral Reading.  He remembered me mentioning it during a workshop I did there last year.  While normally used to help non-fluent readers improve fluency, he used it with his young son who appeared to be developing reading skills quite typically.  However, his anecdotal report was that it tremendously helped his son learn to read and spring ahead of others in the class.  His email asked where he could get more information on the topic.  
The researcher and writer most knowledgeable  on the topic of reading is probably Sally Shaywitz.  She details guided oral reading in on my favorite books, Overcoming Dyslexia: A New and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level Overcoming Dyslexia: A new and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level.  The books discusses all types of reading challenges, not just dyslexia.  That would be my suggestion for additional information on the topic.  
 
 
 

 
Question from Facebook Follower
 
Tony White posted 2 related questions on our FaceBook page this week:  
"In Layered Curriculum, how do you address pacing? Do you set one final due date and then let the students work at their own pace? Or do you set mini-due dates for each layer?"   and
"What assumptions do you have about Learning Activities being completed during class time versus being worked on at home?"
 
Tony, sounds like you're getting ready to start some Layered Curriculum in your room!  The important thing to remember is that you need to make the model fit your needs and the needs of your students.  So, most of your questions can be answered with a "that depends" response.  However, let me make some suggestions.  In regards to due dates - keep deadlines tight.  Students, like most of us, can procrastinate to their own detriment.  Make something due every day.  Don't have them save it all til the end.  Not only is that tough on them, it's tough on you trying to grade it all.  Set very short and tight deadlines.  You can also set deadlines for each layer if that works best for you.  
 
Regarding homework vs classwork:  again it depends on your population.  If your students are fairly good about homework and have the means and environment to do it, you can certainly expect some of the work to be done at home.  I find it best to set up units that can be completed in class time only - IF the students work diligently.  It allows the self-made choice of taking some things home to be completed.  
 
You can find additional information in my new book, Enhancing Your Layered Curriculum® Classroom: Tips, Tune-ups and Technology  available at our bookshop in hard copy and in Kindle electronic format.  

 
November Travels
 
I hope everyone is enjoying the autumn season - most people's favorite.  No exception here, I love it!  And living in New England makes autumn all the sweeter.  But I have enjoyed my travels this month.  A couple of trips to Ohio were topped off last week with a day in Elko, Nevada for a Layered Curriculum workshop with middle school teachers.  It's been a few years since I had the pleasure of driving across the salt desert between Elko and Salt Lake City.  As stunningly beautiful as ever - especially at twilight.  
Today I'm heading back out west for a Layered Curriculum workshop in Visalia, California.  You can see my entire workshop schedule on my calendar page. 
 
I am currently scheduling presentations for all of 2013.  There are a couple of dates left in the spring and many openings for summer / fall 2013.  If you would like to host a workshop, just send me an email.  
 
As always, my best to you and yours,
Kathie

Dr Kathie F Nunley
Layered Curriculum(R) . . . because every child deserves a special education (tm)
 

No time or budget for a full day workshop on Layered Curriculum?  You can order Study Kits - both for individual teachers, or groups.  The individual kits come with a media presenation, books and workbook for putting together your units of study.  Videos available as well.  We now offer book study kits for both "Layered Curriculum" and for "Differentiating the High School Classroom".   
 
> >
 
 
 
 


You are receiving this newsletter because you requested to be on my mailing list by entering your email address at one of the two websites. I NEVER share or sell my newsletter list, nor is it used for any other purpose other than this bi-monthly newsletter. Should you need to be removed from the list, simply reply to this and let me know. 


Layered Curriculum(R) is a trademark developed by and registered to Dr. Kathie F Nunley.  Usage information available at: http://help4teachers.com/usage.htm
Having trouble reading this email? View it in your browser.
Unsubscribe and address change information at the bottom
 
15 years of publication, 17,000+ subscribers                   Wednesday, October 31, 2012
News and updates to Kathie Nunley's Layered Curriculum Sites for Educatiors:  

Tips for Improving School Lunch
New Research on Kindergarten Retention
Teresa Amabile's New Research on Improving Productivity and Motivation
My Fall Travels & Hurricane Sandy          
 

 
Dr Barbara Rolls Speaks to Psychologists at APA Conference On Tips for the Cafeteria
 
Dr Barbara Rolls, of Penn State University, spoke at last August's APA conference giving us suggestions for improving students' eating habits by making simple changes in the school cafeteria food presentation.  She noted that portion SIZE is not necessarily the villain when it comes to obesity  - it's more about food density.  Since people tend to eat the same weight of food, increase the amounts of low-density foods on the plate.  In other words, fill lots of space on the plate with foods that have high water content.  Also, if you're trying to get children to eat more vegetables, provide a variety of them on the plate.  Children eat more vegetables when 3 or 4 are on the plate instead of just 1 or 2.  - Barbara Rolls, PhD. Aug 4, 2012.  You can read more in her new book The Ultimate Volumetrics Diet: Smart, Simple, Science-Based Strategies for Losing Weight and Keeping It Off  
 


HOT TOPIC: Which Students are most likely to be Retained in Kindergarten?
 
In this new era of high stakes testing, the pressure is on for top performance, even as early as kindergarten.  Boys tend to be less ready for kindergarten than girls, so it’s probably no surprise to learn that they tend to be either delayed to start kindergarten and more likely to be retained for another year.
 
Traditionally we have associated poor kindergarten performance and retention with poverty, ethnic minority status, lower maternal education and ELL status.  But this is most probably due to the fact that they tend to be less prepared.  Researchers have now looked at a large sample of kindergarten children and controlling for performance factors, have teased out other predictors for kindergarten retention.  It may surprise you to also learn that even if you control for actual kindergarten performance, white children and native English speakers are the children most likely to be retained in kindergarten.   (citation)

More Hot Topics for this month.........
 


Amabile's Latest Research on Improving Productivity and Motivation
 
I have always been impressed with the research and writings of Dr Teresa Amabile. (One of my favorite works is her Creativity In Context: Update To The Social Psychology Of Creativity)  She is a business professor with a research focus in motivation, productivity and work commitment.  We learn much about the dynamics of students in a classroom by looking at her research on workers in the work place.   Her new work, helping businesses overcome what she refers to as the "crisis of disengagement" again offers many lessons to us as teachers.  After all, who among us hasn’t been frustrated with students who appear disengaged?  I think we can easily take her suggestions on how to improve employees “inner work life” and translate those to students’ “inner learning life”.
 
Dr Amabile spoke on her latest findings at the APA conference in Orlando this past August (Aug 3, 2012).  As I listened to her talk on her latest work, I was struck with how much we can apply to our classrooms.  For example, she notes that good inner work life hinges on making progress daily in meaningful work.  Work that is perceived as useless, meaningless and where the worker is not clear on why they are working on it, does harm to inner work life.  Her list of catalysts for creating the most productive and motivated workers:  sufficient resources, autonomy in work, having clear meaningful goals, access to expertise, and being able to learn from errors without punishment.  Other factors which make a more creative and productive environment include respect and recognition, encouragement and camaraderie.  Sufficient time is helpful, but too much time is detrimental.  You can read about her  latest work in her new book: The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work
 
 

 
Fall Travels Meet the Hurricane
 
While here in northern New England many of our homes remain dark, our thoughts and prayers go out to our neighbors just a few miles south of here along the seaboard who suffered much worse than we did.  I wish you the best as you dig out, dry out and rebuild.
 
My fall travels were a bit re-routed over the weekend due to the storm.  After the parent presenation at Hampstead Academy in New Hampshire last Thursday, I became stuck in central Pennsylvania for a few days waiting on airports to re-open.  I finally did what many other decided to do, rented a car and drove home.  I'm ready though to head back out again for drier land - this time to Elko, Nevada for a Layered Curriculum workshop on Monday.  I look forward to a day or two in the deserts of Nevada.  I have just a couple more workshops before settling back here for the holidays.  You can see my entire workshop schedule on my calendar page. 
 
I am currently scheduling presentations for all of 2013.  There are a couple of dates left in the spring and many openings for summer / fall 2013.  If you would like to host a workshop, just send me an email.  
 
As always, my best to you and yours,
Kathie

Dr Kathie F Nunley
Layered Curriculum(R) . . . because every child deserves a special education (tm)
 

No time or budget for a full day workshop on Layered Curriculum?  You can order Study Kits - both for individual teachers, or groups.  The individual kits come with a media presenation, books and workbook for putting together your units of study.  Videos available as well.  We now offer book study kits for both "Layered Curriculum" and for "Differentiating the High School Classroom".   
 
 
 
 
 
 


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